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Daily Prayer for Creation

In 2012, the Standing Commission of Liturgy and Music (SCLM) of The Episcopal Church, proposed a resolution (2012-A055) containing a series of prayers and liturgies entitled "Daily Prayer for All Seasons" at the 77th General Convention of The Episcopal Church.

The materials below are additional prayers and liturgies pertaining to Creation which were submitted for consideration.

Introduction

"Let us pray."

Those words can be so embracing, so soothing. But there are times when they simply remind us that we don’t have time to pray – not the way we long to. We want to pray without ceasing, but we also want to repair that engine and train the puppy and plow the south 40 before sunset. Still, the call to prayer is strong. The call to pray throughout the day has sounded for centuries as a way to deepen our faith.

Daily Prayer for All Seasons provides a holy – and wholly realistic – way to order our days, no matter how full they seem.

Daily Prayer for All Seasons was compiled and written by a diverse team of people from all over the United States. We came together periodically over four years to create a set of prayers that acknowledge in their brevity both the need to pray and the short time we have to pray. The Daily Prayer for All Seasons team comprised people like you: we have jobs and families, groceries and gardens and ironing; subways to catch, doctors to see, and reports to write. We put these demands on the table. We never lost sight of those pressures on our time and energy as we plowed through wonderful resources for meditation and song, assembling the richest ones into a prayer book for all of us, clergy and laity, who think we're too busy to pray.


Background of Daily Prayer
People in all kinds of religious traditions, including Judaism and Christianity, have been marking time with prayer for almost as long as we’ve had hours. "Praying the hours,"as it's called, has always reminded us that God walks with us throughout each day; "praying the hours"is also a way that the community of faith comes together, whether we’re all in one place or scattered like raindrops. Praying at set hours links us, both to God and to all God’s people. We know this, and we are comforted.

In the Episcopal Church, our Book of Common Prayer offers beautiful services for morning, noon, evening, and nighttime in a section called "The Daily Office"(pp. 35-146). Daily Prayer for All Seasons offers a variation on that theme, a shortened version, where a complete service covers one or two pages at most, thereby eliminating the need to shuffle prayer books and hymnals. Daily Prayer for All Seasons works for individuals, small groups, and/or congregations. This prayer book presents a variety of images of God by including inclusive and expansive language for and about God, and it presents a variety of words by including poetry, meditation and prayers from the broader community of faith.

How To Use What’s Here [Modifications in final version]
The church divides its calendar into periods called "seasons,"which track the events of Jesus'birth, death and resurrection and the coming of the Holy Spirit to the Church. The seasons are Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, Holy Week (the final week of Lent), and Easter, followed by what the church calls Ordinary Time; because Ordinary Time is the longest season in the church year, we crafted two sets of services for the summertime: Creation (spiritual growth) and Rest. The eight sets of seasonal prayers provide the outer structure of Daily Prayer for All Seasons.

For the inner structure, each set of seasonal prayers falls into eight "hours,"which follows the pattern of Benedictine monks, who divided the day into a cycle of eight intervals, called "hours,"that effected a rhythm between work (labora) and prayer (ora). As a contemporary complement, the committee crafting Daily Prayer for All Seasons assigned a specific labor to each prayer "hour": We named dawn as the time for praise; we designated starting the day as the time for discernment; later morning, wisdom; midday, perseverance and renewal; afternoon, love; evening, forgiveness; bedtime, trust; and midnight we named as the time to watch. Each hour has a foreign name, which also dates back to Christian monastic history and which we printed in italics after the hour’s "work" name, for example, Praise (Lauds). [Modifications in this paragraph in final version]

Don’t be inhibited by the hours as we’ve labeled them. Maybe your day "starts"at the crack of noon or your bedtime comes after the night shift; maybe the end of your workday marks only the beginning of meetings for another part of your life. It’s all right to adjust the prayers to the day as you live it, no matter how topsy-turvy it seems. In addition, it's all right to adapt the texts as you need to. [This paragraph edited and expanded in final version]


Format for the Hours

Basic form (Praise, Watch): Written in first person and generally anticipated for private use.
Entering and Going out: the same simple, short call-and-response, which emphasizes the spiritual work of the hour [This description modified in final version]
Scripture: a short, easily memorized passage, related to both the time and the season
Meditation: a question or a prompt for spiritual reflection
Prayer: a closing collect related to the hour and season
Shorter hours during the day (Wisdom, Perseverance and Renewal, Love, Trust): Intended for group use, may be adapted for individual use.These add the following to the basic form:
Prayer: an opening collect, suited to time and season
Praise: hymn, psalm or canticle
Meditation: an inspirational quote precedes the prompt for reflection
Prayers: responsive prayers of the people, with space for personal intercession and thanksgiving
Lord's Prayer: Versions of the prayer are omitted to allow for local traditions; if praying in a group, the leader may choose to specify the form of the prayer (old/new, short/long, English/foreign) to be used or encourage worshippers to pray in the language of the heart (versions of the Lord’s Prayer appear in the Appendix of the Blue Book [not reproduced on this website]).
Longer hours (Discernment, Forgiveness): Intended for group use, may be adapted for individual use.
To the above, add the following:
Discernment: affirmation
Forgiveness: confession and assurance of pardon (the latter allows for lay leadership of the hour whereas absolution requires a bishop or priest)

The consultants who began this project in 2007 did so in prayer and with the hope that anyone–newcomer, stalwart or someone in between—who wants to pray within the Christian tradition will be enriched by Daily Prayer for All Seasons.

Devon Anderson, Mark Bozutti-Jones, Rebecca Clark, Joseph Farnes, Paul Fromberg, Paul Joo, Lizette Larson-Miller, Julia McCray-Goldsmith, Sam Dessórdi Leite, Ernesto Medina, Clay Morris, Elizabeth Muñoz, Ruth Meyers, Dan Prechtel, Cristina Rose Smith, Carol Wade, Julia Wakelee-Lynch, Louis Weil.

With gratitude,
The Rev. Julia Wakelee-Lynch
March 2011
Berkeley, California

Ordinary Time: Creation

The Season after Pentecost is not actually a season with a single common focus, but is simply the weeks between the Day of Pentecost and the First Sunday of Advent. It is often called "Ordinary Time." These weeks hold both the slower pace and peaceful quality of summer months and the quicker pace and flurry of activity in the early fall. These are our "ordinary" days, in which we live the Christian faith in our daily lives.

During these weeks, as the liturgical scholar Leonel Mitchell puts it, we celebrate "the time in which we actually live—the period between the Pentecost and the Second Advent." Two thousand years after the first Pentecost, the church still lives in this "in between"time before the fulfillment of time in Christ’s second coming. You might also hear these weeks called "the long, green season," referring both to the green color of the vestments and altar hangings for these weeks as well as to the summertime of year in which many of the weeks fall in the northern hemisphere.

After Pentecost we settle into the growing season, nourishing the seeds planted at Easter and putting down roots in our faith.

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Praise   Lauds

(Traditional hour: dawn/waking up)

Laudate, omnes gentes, laudate Dominum! [Sing praises, all people, sing praises to the Lord!]

We greet the new day by praising the Creator (the ancient name for this hour, Lauds, means "praise").

Opening: This is the day that the Lord has made;
I will rejoice and be glad in it.
Scripture: O Lord,how manifold are your works!
Psalm 104:27
Meditation: How will I use the gift of this new day? How will I notice the glory of creation?
Prayer: I ask all blessings.
I ask them with reverence,
of my mother the earth,
of the sky, moon, and sun my father.
I am old age: the essence of life,
I am the source of all happiness.
All is peaceful, all in beauty,
All in harmony, all in joy. Amen.1
Going Out: This is the day that the Lord has made;
I will rejoice and be glad in it.

[prayer and footnote modified in final version]

1 Navajo prayer (anon.),as found in Canticles of the Earth: Celebrating the Presence of God in Nature, F. Lynne Bachleda, ed. (Chicago: Loyola Press, 2004), p. 83.

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Discernment   Prime

(Traditional hour: morning/start of the day)

As we begin the day, we focus on our calling to live faithfully, for who knows what today holds?.

Opening: Holy God,you are always with us.
Open our eyes to your presence.
Prayer: God of faithful surprises,throughout the ages you have made known your love and power in unexpected ways and places: May we daily perceive the joy and wonder of your abiding presence and offer our lives in gratitude for our redemption. Amen.1
Praise:

Benedicite Omnia Opera
All you works of God, bless your creator;
praise her and glorify her for ever.

Let the wide earth bless the creator;
let the arching heavens bless the creator;
let the whole body of God bless the creator;
praise her and glorify her for ever.

You returning daylight, bless your creator;
twilight and shadows, bless your creator;
embracing darkness, bless your creator;
praise her and glorify her for ever.

Let all who live and grow and breathe
bless our creator,
praise her and glorify her for ever.
Janet Morley 2

Scripture: I am the vine, you are the branches. Those who abide in me and I in them bear much fruit because, apart from me, they can do nothing. You did not choose me, but I chose you. And I appointed you to go and bear fruit, fruit that will last.
John 15:5, 16a
Meditation: People say that walking on water is a miracle, but to me, walking peacefully on the
earth is the real miracle.
Thich Nhat Hanh 3
  How will we walk in peace today?
Affirmation:
We believe in God, the creator of all life and beauty,
who blesses our journey.
We believe in Jesus Christ,
who lived as a friend and savior to all he met as he traveled,
and who ate and laughed,wept and celebrated with them in love.
We believe in the Holy Spirit,
who rides on the gentle breeze,
who strengthens our bindings,and
who offers hope eternal.
We believe in the church,
which stands open to all travelers,
and bears witness to the everlasting love of God.4
Prayers:

As we turn to the tasks before us this day,
Fill us, gracious Lord.
In making faithful choices, great and small,
Guide us, gracious Lord.
As we seek to notice and serve those in need,
Teach us, gracious Lord.

Here, the people may add particular intercessions or thanksgivings.

As we offer our lives to you,
Hear us, gracious Lord.
With our hearts ready to serve,
Accompany us, gracious Lord.

Lord's Prayer
Prayer: Generous Giver, you pour forth your extravagant bounty without measure upon your whole creation: Teach us such generosity, that the fruits of our spirits and the works of our hands may build your commonwealth of blessing. Amen.5
Going Out: Holy God,you are always with us.
Open our eyes to your presence.

1 Revised Common Lectionary Prayers, proposed by the Consultation on Common Texts (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2002), p. 135.
2 Janet Morley, excerpted from All Desires Known (Morehouse Press, 1992), p. 37
3 Thich Nhat Hahn, from Love in Action: Writings on Nonviolent Social Change, as found in Canticles of the Earth: Celebrating the Presence of God in Nature, F. Lynn Bachleda, ed. (Chicago: Loyola Press, 2004), p. 4.
4 From Shore to Shore: Liturgies, Litanies and Prayers from Around the World (London: SPCK, 2003, p. 68.
5 Revised Common Lectionary Prayers, proposed by the Consultation on Common Texts (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2002), p. 170

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Wisdom   Terce

(Traditional hour: mid-morning)

Having asked for direction and guidance, we pray now to equip ourselves properly for the journey ahead.

Opening: Let all who desire wisdom
walk in love.
Prayer: Holy Lord,giver of all wisdom: Set for us this day the banquet of your word; invite us to feast on the genius and beauty all around us. Then, turn us in humility toward the poor, the oppressed and the weak; we ask this in the name of Jesus, who is Wisdom for ever and ever. Amen.1
Praise:

A Song of Pilgrimage (Ecclesiasticus 51:13-16, 20b-22)2

Before I ventured forth, even while I was very young, *
I sought wisdom openly in my prayer.
In the forecourts of the temple I asked for her, *
and I will seek her to the end.
From first blossom to early fruit, *
she has been the delight of my heart.
My foot has kept firmly to the true path, *
diligently from my youth have I pursued her.
I inclined my ear a little and received her; *
I found for myself much wisdom and became adept in her.
To the one who gives me wisdom will I give glory, *
for I have resolved to live according to her way.
From the beginning I gained courage from her; *
therefore I will not be forsaken.
In my inmost being, I have been stirred to seek her; *
therefore have I gained a good possession.
As my reward, the Almighty has given me the gift of language,*
and with it will I offer praise to God.
Scripture: But the wisdom from above is first pure,then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy and good fruits, without a trace of partiality or hypocrisy. And a harvest of righteousness is sown in peace for those who make peace.
James 3:17-18
Meditation: "Focus on Wisdom and do not be distracted. Watch the patterns of creation, and you will awaken to grace and tranquility."
Proverbs 3:19-223
  How will we remain focused today so as to receive wisdom from creation?
Prayers:

O God,in peace, you have prepared our path for today.
Help us to trace it in peace.
If we speak,
Remove lies from our lips.
If we are hungry,
Rid us of complaint.
If we have plenty,
Flatten the pride in us.
We offer these prayers of our hearts to your wise guidance:

Here, the people may add particular intercessions or thanksgivings.

May we pass through the day, calling on you,
O Lord, who knows no other Lord. Amen.4

Lord's Prayer
Prayer: Holy One, in love you created us and called it good: Grant us the deep wisdom of your love that, wherever this day leads, our lives may remain rooted in your goodness; through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen.
Going Out: Let all who desire wisdom
walk in love.

1 Adapted from J. Frank Henderson, A Prayer Book for Remembering the Women (Chicago: Liturgy Training Publications, 2001), p.119.
2 Canticle B, Enriching our Worship 1 (New York: Church Publishing Inc., 1998), p. 30
3 Rabbi Rami Shapiro, trans. The Divine Feminine in Biblical Wisdom Literature: Selections and Annotated & Explained (Woodstock, Vermont: Skylight Paths Publishing, 2005), p. 169.
4 Adapted from "You have prepared in peace the path," as found in An African Prayer Book (New York: Doubleday, 1995), Desmond Tutu, ed., p. 119.

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Perseverance/Renewal   Sext

(Traditional hour: mid-day)

As we pause to feed our bodies in the middle of the day, we pause also to feed our souls by vowing again to live faithfully.

Opening: God's power, working in us,
does more than we imagine: Glory to God!
Prayer: Creating God,your reign of love makes all things new: Plant seeds of confidence and gladness in our hearts so that, trusting in your word, we may live no longer for ourselves but for him who died and was raised for us, Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen.1
Praise:

For the Beauty of the Earth
(Music, if desired, may be found in The Hymnal 1982, #416.)

For the beauty of the earth,
For the beauty of the skies,
For the love which from our birth
Over and around us lies:
Christ our God, to thee we raise
This our sacrifice of praise.

For the beauty of each hour,
Of the day and of the night,
Hill and vale and tree and flower,
Sun and moon and stars of light:
Christ, our God, to thee we raise
This our sacrifice of praise.
Words: Folliot Sandford Pierpont (1835-1917)

Scripture: So let us not grow weary in doing what is right, for we will reap at harvest-time if we do not give up. So then, whenever we have an opportunity, let us work for the good of all, and especially for those of the family of faith.
Galatians 6:9-10
Meditation: "Care … rests upon genuine religion.Care allows creatures to escape our explanations into their actual presence and their essential mystery. In taking care of our fellow creatures, we acknowledge that they are not ours; we acknowledge that they belong to an order and harmony of which we ourselves are parts. To answer to the perpetual crisis of our presence in this abounding and dangerous world, we have only the perpetual obligation of care."
Wendell Berry2
  At this hour, how is God calling us to care for creation?
Prayers:

O God, whose Spirit moved upon the waters,
we remember those who live in lands of drought or flood,
whose harvest is not-enough or not-at-all.
Today, they sow in tears:
soon, may they reap with shouts of joy.

We remember those whose water supply is polluted by negligence or need,
those to whom water brings disease, poisoning or radiation,
whose gift of life is cursed by death.
Today, they sow in tears:
soon, may they reap with shouts of joy.

We remember ourselves:
We devastate the waters and the fruits of the earth,
and we are unwilling to form one circle
with our brothers and sisters around the world.

Here, the people may add particular intercessions or thanksgivings.

And we ask, Merciful Creator,
to shed their tears
that soon we may all reap with shouts of joy. 3
Lord's Prayer
Prayer: Source of life and blessing,
of garden, orchard, field:
Root us in obedience to you
and nourish us by your ever-flowing Spirit
that, perceiving only the good we might do,
our lives may be fruitful,
our labor productive,
and our service useful,
in communion with Jesus, our brother. Amen.4
Going Out: God's power, working in us,
does more than we imagine: Glory to God!
   

1 Revised Common Lectionary Prayers, proposed by the Consultation on Common Texts (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2002),p. 148.
2 Wendell Berry, from Another Turn of the Crank, as found in The Sacred Earth: Writers on Nature and Spirit, Jason Gardner, ed. (Novato, Ca.: New World Library, 1998), p. 115.
3 Adapted from a prayer written by Clare Amos/Methodist Church in the UK, as found in From Shore to Shore: Liturgies, Litanies and Prayers from Around the World (London: SPCK, 2003), p. 83.
4 Revised Common Lectionary Prayers, proposed by the Consultation on Common Texts (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2002), p. 85.

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Love   None

(Traditional hour: afternoon)

As shadows lengthen, we are filled by the day's encounters; now, more than ever, we accept the depth and breadth of God's grace.

Opening: As you have loved us,
may we love one another.
Prayer: O Tree of Calvary, send your roots deep into my soul. Gather together my frailties – my soiled heart, my sandy instability and my muddy desires – and entwine them with the strong roots of your arboreal love. Amen.1
Praise:
Lord God,we praise you for those riches of our creation
that we will never see:
For stars whose light will never reach the earth;
For species of living things that were born,
that flourished and perished
before humankind appeared in the world;
For patterns and colors in the flowers,
which only insect eyes are able to see;
For strange, high music
that humans can never hear.
Lord God, you see everything that you have made
and behold that it is very good.
Anonymous2
Scripture: I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.
John 13:34-35
Meditation: "Isn't that what friendship is all about: giving to each other the gift of our belovedness?"
Henri Nouwen 3
  Where do we need to offer and receive the gift of our belovedness? How can we treat the earth as beloved?
Prayers:

As the day lengthens,O Christ,
Teach us to walk in your love.
While we strive to be faithful in word and deed,
Teach us to love one another.
While we live as part of your creation,
Teach us to love this good earth.
While we offer our prayers this hour:

Here, the people may add particular intercessions or thanksgivings.

With grateful hearts,
Teach us to trust in your love.

Lord's Prayer
Prayer: Gracious Lord, the air sings with songs of glory, water flashes silver with creation, and the forests bloom with leaves for healing nations: May your light and love fill our hearts and souls and minds, that we may share your love with the world. Amen. 4
Going Out: As you have loved us,
may we love one another.

1 As found in From Shore to Shore: Liturgies, Litanies and Prayers from Around the World (London: SPCK, 2003, p. 79.
2 As found in Canticles of the Earth: Celebrating the Presence of God in Nature, F. Lynn Bachleda, ed. (Chicago: Loyola Press, 2004), p. 19.
3 Henri Nouwen, Life of the Beloved: Spiritual Living in a Secular World (New York: Crossroad Publishing, 1992), p. 30.
4 Adapted from From Shore to Shore: Liturgies, Litanies and Prayers from Around the World (London: SPCK, 2003), p. 98

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Forgiveness   Vespers

(Traditional hour: night/bedtime)

As we turn on lamps at dusk, we greet the evening by welcoming God to abide with us anew.

Opening: If anyone is in Christ,
there is a new creation.
Prayer: Creating God,your reign of love makes all things new: Plant seeds of confidence and gladness in our hearts, so that, trusting your word, we may live no longer for ourselves but for him who died and was raised for us, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.1
Praise: Doxology2
May none of God's wonderful works keep silence,
night or morning.
Bright stars, high mountains, the depths of the seas,
sources of rushing rivers:
May all these break into song as we sing
to Creator, Savior and Holy Spirit.
May all the angels in the heavens reply:
Amen! Amen! Amen!
Power, praise, honor and eternal glory to God,
the only giver of grace.
Amen! Amen! Amen!
Anonymous (third century)
Scripture: So if anyone is in Christ,there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new! All this is from God, who reconciled us through Christ and has given us the ministry of reconciliation.
2 Corinthians 5:17-18
Meditation: "We should be clear about what happens when we destroy the living forms of this planet. The first consequence is that we destroy modes of divine presence."
Thomas Berry3
  What will we do today to preserve God’s work in creation?
Confession: We confess
that we have considered the earth to be our own,
believing God gave us dominion and, thus, absolute control over it.

We affirm that
"the earth is the Lord’s and all that is in it,
for he has founded it on the seas and established it on the rivers." (Psalm 24:1-2)
We repent.
We know we need to change our understanding of creation,
taking our share of responsibility for its care and protection.

We believe
that the Spirit, God’s recreating power,
is active in us and in the world.
God, Creator of all,
may humankind be freed from greed, which is destroying the earth;
and may your courageous churches take up causes against the forces
that threaten life.
Amen.
4
Assurance of Pardon:
God does not deal with us according to our sins,
nor repay us by the measure of our failings.
As vast as the distance from one end of creation to another,
God’s love for us is even greater.
As far as east is from west,
from greater than this distance does God remove our sin from us.
Thanks be to God.5
Prayers:

Holy One, we praise you for the wonders of your creation:
Make us joyful and faithful stewards.
As the day grows long,
Bless us with the gift of laying down our burdens.
And not ours only:
Help us lift the weights we have placed on others and on your creation.
We offer these prayers of our hearts:

Here, the people may add particular intercessions or thanksgivings.

Create in us, again and always, your heart of grace.
May we rest on the sure foundation of your love.

Lord's Prayer
Prayer: Give us strength to understand and eyes to see;
teach us to walk the soft earth as related
to all that lives. Amen.6
Going Out: If anyone is in Christ,
there is a new creation.

1 Revised Common Lectionary Prayers, proposed by the Consultation on Common Texts (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2002), p.148.
2 This version is slightly altered from Canticles of the Earth: Celebrating the Presence of God in Nature, F. Lynn Bachleda, ed. (Chicago: Loyola Press, 2004), p. 13.
3 Thomas Berry, as found in The Sacred Earth: Writers on Nature and Spirit, Jason Gardner, ed. (Novato, Ca.: New World Library, 1998), p. 121.
4 Adapted from the confession in “For the Healing of Creation: An order of service to celebrate creation,” as found in From Shore to Shore: Liturgies, Litanies and Prayers from Around the World (London: SPCK, 2003), pp. 39-40.
5 Based on Psalm 103:10-12.
6 Native American prayer, as found in From Shore to Shore: Liturgies, Litanies and Prayers from Around the World (London: SPCK, 2003), p. 97.

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Trust   Compline

(Traditional hour: dusk/end of the day)

We sum up this day with a bedtime prayer to examine our conscience and offer our actions to God.

Opening: The Lord almighty grant us a peaceful night
and a perfect end. Amen.
Prayer: God our desire, whose coming we look for, but whose arrival is unexpected: Here in the darkness make us urgent to greet you, and open yourself to our longing that we may be known by you through Jesus Christ, Amen.1
Praise: Lifetime Psalm2
Praise my soul, our good Lord.
Sing songs to God's name,
for God has brought my life
into fresh waters when I was thirsty.
God has fed me with the Bread of Life
when I was starving.
God has sustained me along all my days
and never has put me to shame.
Praise my soul, our good Lord,
for such abundant goodness.
Scripture: Blessed are those who trust in the Lord, whose trust is the Lord. They shall be like a tree planted by water, sending out its roots by the stream. It shall not fear when heat comes, and its leaves shall stay green; in the year of drought, it is not anxious, and it does not cease to bear fruit.
Jeremiah 17:7-8
Meditation: "Fish cannot drown in water, birds cannot sink in air, gold cannot perish in the refiner’s fire. This has God given to all creatures: to foster and seek their own nature."
Mechthild of Magdeburg (13th century)
  What has God given us today to help us be more fully ourselves?
Prayer:

Creator God,
you call us to love and serve you with body, mind, and spirit
through loving your creation and our sisters and brothers.
Open our hearts in compassion and receive these petitions
on behalf of the needs of the church and the world.

Here, the people may add particular intercessions or thanksgivings.

Lord's Prayer
Prayer: Holy One,you planted us by living water, that we might be rooted in righteousness. You call us to be holy as you are holy. Assured of your love, help us cast aside all fear, so that we may love our neighbors as ourselves. Amen.3
Going Out: The Lord almighty grant us a peaceful night
and a perfect end. Amen.

1 Janet Morley, All Desires Known, (Morehouse Press, 1992), p. 25.
2 Adapted from a prayer of the church in Uruguay, as found in From Shore to Shore, p. 91.
3 Revised Common Lectionary Prayers, proposed by the Consultation on Common Texts (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2002), p. 204.

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Watch   Vigils

(Traditional hour: late night)

Like nuns and monks at prayer, we can listen in the stillness of the night to hear God’s call.

Opening: All creation longs for grace:
I wait in hope.
Scripture: Be still,then, and know that I am God;
I will be exalted among the nations;
I will be exalted in the earth.
Psalm 46:11 (BCP)
Meditation: How will I be still and trusting this night?
Prayers:
Hidden God,ever present to me
may I now be present to you,
attentive to your every word,
attuned to your inspirations,
alert to your touch.
Empty me that I may be filled with you alone. Amen.1
Going Out: All creation longs for grace:
I wait in hope.

1 Patricia B.Clark, Women’s Uncommon Prayers; Our Lives Revealed, Nurtured, Celebrated (Morehouse Publishing, 2000), p. 222.

(Source: Blue Book for the 77th General Convention)

NOTE: Daily Prayers for Rest was also part of 2012-A055. These prayers will be added during 2013.

 

Celtic Divider

 

The EpEN is a national network of active lay and clergy persons within the Episcopal Church, USA, who share a common concern for the environment and a common belief in the presence of God in all Creation and who work to make these concerns and beliefs known throughout all Provinces and Dioceses within the church.  Members come from around the Episcopal Church, USA.  The activities of the EpEN are focused on the areas of Reflection, Education, and Action. 

If you would like to contact any of these groups or to find out more about the EpEN, please click on the links on the left.

 

last update:  2013-02-26

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